a pattern of my own choosing

0192_a pattern of my own choosing

While rummaging around in the old hand-painted storage chest that houses my collection of fabric, embroidery floss, and pattern books, I unearthed a piece of unfinished embroidery I began designing years ago. I imagine I set the project aside to work on making a gift for someone else – a Christmas ornament, perhaps. Life got busier, days dissolved into years, and I forgot all about this half-finished patchwork until I unrolled it and held it again in my hands. I was surprised by the prettiness of the intricate patterns I devoted my time to years ago. I thought to myself, it’s funny how the process of creating a work of art –whether it’s stitched or composed or painted or sculpted or written– can be so much like life: when you’re deep in the middle, you can get so close to it, become so accustomed to its contours, or so annoyed by distractions, or dejected by your mistakes, that you can’t see it clearly anymore; you can forget how beautiful it is.

The embroidery I used to create this piece is called blackwork. Blackwork, which was at its zenith in the days of Henry VIII, was worked with black silk thread on white linen to create patterns that mimicked lace. Only the wealthy could afford to wear costly laces at that time, so those who desired the look of lace and were deft with a needle worked to transform strips of linen into lacy, expensive-looking collars, cuffs, and sleeves. Here’s a photo to illustrate how blackwork looked in its heyday:

0192_wiki image of blackwork

[Photo credit: Wikipedia]

Although the patterns in blackwork appear complex, they’re actually easy to stitch. Each design is created by outlining a shape with a running stitch, then by sewing one simple, straight stitch after another to form a pattern.

I run my finger over my own tiny stitches and meditate on this unfinished piece of blackwork. The flight of years, the joys, sorrows, sunlight, and shadows through which I’ve passed have made me view this piece differently now than I did when I began it. These stitches have moved from something merely decorative towards something more metaphorical.

I examine the varied patterns. Some are delicate and spare, others are heavy and intense; some step forward with warmth and presence, others are cool and recede. How very like people these patterned squares are; each one is unique, and beautiful, and connected to the others around it. What a diverse, yet harmonious, gathering this is…

You might care to guess which square is my favorite.

I’ll tell you: it’s the unfinished one.

0192_a pattern of my own choosing, closeup

Why? Because it holds possibilities. It’s not too late to go back and begin again with a brand new color, or even an entirely different pattern. Just as in life, it’s not too late to change, and that’s what I find appealing.

However, I’m content with the color and pattern I’ve chosen, so now, all I must do is take up my needle again. It’s been a long time, but I know how to do this, of course I do! Just as in life, I can move forward at any time with a pattern of my own choosing.

How do I begin? It’s simple, really: day by day, moment to moment, breath by breath, stitch by stitch.

Just look at this beautiful work of art I’m creating.

******

(This is the second in a 5-day Photo/Story Challenge series. I was nominated to this challenge by Kristine, a wonderful writer and friend who blogs regularly at candidkay.)

10 thoughts on “a pattern of my own choosing

  1. in every way: beautiful. you are a renaissance creator in every breathtaking way…….i’d never ever heard of blackwork. and i am enchanted. your stitchery is just beautiful.

    • Thank you, dear Barbara. Blackwork is indeed an enchantment. I just love the look of it, and I’m fascinated by its place in history. xoxo

    • And you, my friend, are far too kind. Every life, with its successes and tragedies and delights and discouragements, is a beautiful work of art. xox

  2. Oh, Amy. This is so beautiful! And yes, the unfinished one, of course. I always say it’s easier to live in possibility than with the flesh and blood realities sometimes directly in front of us. Here’s to that unfinished square symbolizing what you’re living into–pure beauty.

  3. Amy, you have such a gift of words to express you inspirational thoughts. I printed this particular post so I could read and re-read it. At the age of 83 I can reflect on my life and identify with your message, and I continue to face each day with anticipation counting my many blessings, especially the blessing to bear the burdens that come my way. The one thing that never changes and remains constant in my life is my Heavenly Father, my Savior and my Comforter and Guide. (Although there are times when I am weak, He always draws me back into His presence.) God bless you.

    • That you have found resonance and inspiration in my small offering is indeed a gift and blessing to me, Martha, and I thank you. Much love to you. xox

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